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Where to buy in Edinburgh (for my baby to happily grow into)?

(13 Posts)
funnyface80 Wed 08-Mar-17 21:32:27

I could really do with some views/advice..confused We are not from Edinburgh but have lived here a couple of years before DD arrived. Loved and lived in Stockbridge the entire time but renting. Owner won't sell so we are house hunting in a depressing market - very little out there and we seem to constantly losing out on closed bids despite decent offers. We are considering offering on a couple of places but I'm torn between what's right for DD long-term as well as for us. So, a wee bungalow in say Blackhall or Corstophine vs a flat in the West End/New Town with communal garden vs an upper/lower in somewhere like Leith Links. DH and I both work in the centre of town but also travel with work. Which options would be better choice in the long term? Which would be better if we had to up sticks and move somewhere else for a couple of years and had to rent out the place? Many thanks in advance!

Lesley1980 Wed 08-Mar-17 21:40:16

I'd personally go for the flat in town. Lots for kids to do near the city.

funnyface80 Wed 08-Mar-17 21:46:43

Thanks Lesley80 - my heart says exactly that - centre of town would surely be easy for kids to do stuff, communal gardens, swimming pools close by etc. but we get the guilt trip from in-laws who bang on about a house with a garden for her to run around in. Am I overthinking this?

LilyDa Wed 08-Mar-17 23:10:37

We have the bungalow with the garden and it is great for our girls to charge about in over the summer, but they've barely set foot in it since the autumn so once you factor in the weather & time they're at school it doesn't get a huge amount of use. And we aren't gardeners so the upkeep is a bit of hassle. I do like where we live, I like the space and looking out into the garden and seeing greenery (a lot of greenery, mainly due to the lack of gardening interest...) but I do also wander round Stockbridge thinking how lovely it is and wouldn't it be nice if this was on my doorstep rather than 20-30min walk!

funnyface80 Thu 09-Mar-17 09:14:53

Hi LilyDa, that is very insightful - thank you. Currently close contenders are a flat a in town vs a bungalow in Blackhall. Worried the latter may not have much nearby but like the idea of of a toddler being let free to run out into the garden while I cook confused

LilyDa Thu 09-Mar-17 18:24:30

Well, there are two cafes in the dip at Blackhall (I spend too much time in Cloudberry) and another one further up the road, clubs/activities such as ballet, rainbows etc at St Columba's, nursery options, and the library is an easy walk and has various events on, so you might find enough going on? And the 42 will take you straight down into Stockbridge again smile

catdil Thu 09-Mar-17 20:47:53

Love living in town (marchmont) and kids love having all the other local kids to play with in the communal gardens they share. Far more fun than hanging with mum !

funnyface80 Thu 09-Mar-17 22:25:26

Thank you Lilyda and Catdil - fingers crossed we find the right one soon. Bidding on few at the minute and being all philosophical that what is best for us will come to us soon...smile

Chesnuts Thu 09-Mar-17 22:47:39

Depends how much money you have got. We lived in flat - Bruntsfield but ended up moving out to bungalow as really really really needed own garden for DC. School catchments also a factor for us

LonnyVonnyWilsonFrickett Thu 09-Mar-17 22:54:40

I actually can't believe I'm going to be 'that' parent and offer 'that' advice - but look at school catchments and buy as close as you can to a good primary (common) that feeds into a good secondary (maybe less common). Look at things like distance too - I'm not even sure where the catchment primary is for the West end lol. But when you are doing it twice a day, then popping back and forth for activities and events, it's nice to know it is close.

On the other matters, I've had a flat near a park and a garden. The only difference with a garden is that if it's a rubbish summer you can literally shout: it's stopped raining, everybody out! And that takes 2 seconds, instead of gathering up all your bits and pieces and heading to the park and then it starts raining again before you even get there.

To add, PILs are a bit obsessed with front doors and gardens ime. Nothing wrong with a flat and personally I'd go as central as poss, taking schools into account.

funnyface80 Sun 12-Mar-17 21:30:10

Thanks Chestnuts and LonnyVonnyWilsonFrickett - useful to hear you perspectives. Biggest challenge is just trying to find anything in what looks like a pretty desperate market at the minute. Fingers crossed and hoping whatever we get is right. wine

Chesnuts Mon 13-Mar-17 14:34:11

Market is tough I agree. Took us 18 month to find something

Nospringflower Tue 21-Mar-17 08:33:14

My advice would be to be close to other children. We moved from Bruntsfield further out to the suburbs but actually we arent really near anyone from their school whereas in places like Greenbank (and maybe Blackhall) there are lots of kids for them to play with. To me that is more important than the garden (which we chose!). NOw they are at high school they get the bus everywhere anyway so its less of an issue.

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